Survey of European Women’s/Gender History

Course #: HI271

Background

Secondary sources

  • Primo
    • Laurier's catalogue contains all our books (print and online) as well as millions of articles. It can sometimes be difficult to narrow down to useful resources, so consider different filters, such as searching just for books.
  • Historical Abstracts
    • Where Primo searches across all disciplines, this database only indexes academic material in history.
  • JSTOR
    • While most of these full text titles are indexed in Historical Abstracts, searching JSTOR itself provides a search across the full text, which when done carefully, can find unique results.
    • Since JSTOR contains journal articles starting with the first volumes, some of the older content could also be considered primary source material.
  • Literature Online
    • Literary sources, both secondary and primary.

Primary Sources

Primary source material can be found both in print (usually reprinted) and online (digitized). In Primo, add words such as "sources" "diaries" or "letters" to your search term to find anthologies of primary sources. For example, see the results for a search on "women's rights sources."

If you have a title of a particular book published before 1923, you can likely find it in the Internet Archive.

Some libraries and archives digitize their archival collections, and can possibly be found through Google. In addition to a search term, add "primary sources" and site:edu, and you will find sites such as this.

The Library also subscribes to collections of digitized primary sources:

Primary sources - Collections

Primary Sources - Newspapers and Magazines

Multimedia

Citing your Sources

Most library resources provide you with citation formatting displayed under the heading "cite" or "citation." For this class you are required to follow the Laurier History Department Style Guide, which in turn is based on the Chicago Manual of Style (library subscription).