Integrating Theory and Practice

Course #: SK536

About this Guide

This guide was created for SK536 students. It provides information about doing a literature review, finding sources that contribute to evidence-based practice, and critically evaluating sources of information.

Doing a Literature Review

A literature review is an up-to-date overview of the most important research about a specific topic. It only includes the most pertinent literature on the topic, so careful searching and selection are required.

Finding Sources

a) Peer-reviewed Articles

Peer-reviewed journal articles are the best sources of evidence-based information. Visit the Social Work Subject Guide for a list of databases to search for articles.

b) Scholarly Books

Search the Library catalogue using Advanced Search for scholarly books.

c) Systematic Reviews

Systematic reviews identify and analyze all of the research that has been done on a specific topic. They expose gaps in research and can help practitioners make decisions by revealing what up-to-date evidence shows.

“A systematic review attempts to identify, appraise and synthesize all the empirical evidence that meets pre-specified eligibility criteria to answer a given research question. Researchers conducting systematic reviews use explicit methods aimed at minimizing bias, in order to produce more reliable findings that can be used to inform decision making.”

~ Cochrane Library, About Cochrane Reviews

To find systematic reviews on a specific topic, try searching these resources:

d) Grey Literature

Grey literature is usually not peer-reviewed, and it is often unpublished. Examples of this type of source are:

  • Conference papers
  • Government reports
  • Policy statements
  • Association publications

There are many places to search for grey literature. Try, for example:

Critically Evaluating Sources

You must critically evaluate grey literature sources.

Citing Sources in APA, 6th Ed.

You'll find the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association in the Kitchener Collection (BF76.7.P83 2010).

It's also important to know when to cite. Understanding Plagiarism (video: 4:48) is an essential academic skill.

Questions?

Please don't hesitate to get in touch! You can email, phone or drop-in: mefischer@wlu.ca, 519-884-0710 ext. 4973. I'm in my office, FSW304, on Tuesdays and Thursdays.